© 2023 by Wapack Pups

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1-351-201-6242

wapackpups@gmail.com

Ashburnham, Massachusetts 01430

  • Getting a new puppy is very exciting! Remember that your puppy is a baby and is in a new environment. 

  • Although you will be tempted to show off your new puppy, it is recommended that you keep him home so he can get acclimated to his new home. 

  • Vaccinations are not complete until about 16 weeks of age, so your puppy is not yet fully protected from diseases. 

  • Establish a place for his crate and his feeding dishes. The crate should be close to where your family congregates. 

  • Feed your puppy at regularly scheduled times. This will help establish potty training. 

  • It is not unusual for your puppy to have a soft or liquid stool, as they are adjusting to a new environment. If it continues, see your vet. 

  • Do not change your puppy’s food! (See page on Food and Feeding.)

  • Allow plenty of down-time for your puppy, as he is a growing baby and needs lots of rest. 

 

 

  • Ask your friends or family for veterinarian recommendations.  

  • Once you know when you are getting your puppy, please schedule an appointment with your veterinarian. Your puppy will need be seen by the vet within 3 days of receiving your puppy.

  • Make sure you take your Health Record, which is in your puppy packet, with you, to the vet. This way they will not duplicate vaccines already given. 

  • At the first visit, make sure you take along a blanket or towel to place on the vet’s table. This will help protect your puppy from diseases that may be lingering in the vet’s office. Do NOT ever put your puppy on the floor in the veterinarian’s office. 

  • Your puppy comes current on deworming’s and your vet will give you a schedule for parasite control and future vaccination needs.  

  • Puppy supplies needed: 

  • Stainless steel food and water bowls

  • Harness or collar for walking

  • Leash

  • Crate large wire with pan

  • Brush, comb, and puppy shampoo

  • Soft, washable bed (no towels, please)

  • Puppy corral or playpen to keep your puppy safe 

  • Toys made especially for puppies, such as Nyla bones for Puppies

 

  • Your puppy has been fed BLUE BUFFALO LIFE PROTECTION FORMULA PUPPY FOOD. We recommend that you continue feeding this same food for at least 10 months. If you make a change, you must do it gradually to avoid digestive upset. 

  • Your puppy has been fed 3-4 TIMES A DAY. To aid in housebreaking, you will want to establish set feeding times. Puppies up to 5 months of ages, eat 3 times a day. Puppies 6 to 10 months of age, eat 2 meals a day. 

  • Follow the directions on the bag for recommended feeding amount. 

  • Puppy food has been fed dry with nothing added. This is best for the development of their teeth.

  • We use NUVET WAFERS Order # 53418 AND MILK BONES treats to reward puppies for going potty outside and other training. There are also other quality treats. Find one that your puppy will work for. 

  • Use treats sparingly as a reward, as they add calories.

  • Positive reinforcement for good behavior will go much further than punishment for bad behavior. 

  • We highly recommend crate training to aid in housebreaking. Dogs are, by nature, den animals and feel secure in small, enclosed spaces. A wire crate is recommended to allow your dog optimum visibility of her surroundings. You can cover the crate with a blanket to create a den.

  • When selecting a crate for a puppy, go ahead and get one to fit the dog’s needs when she is fully grown.  Make sure it has a removable divider for training.

  • Place your crate where the puppy can see what is going on, as dogs are highly social animals. 

  • Allow your puppy to explore the crate on her own. You can toss some of her favorite toys or treats inside to encourage her curiosity. Leave the door open during the introduction period. NEVER force your dog into her crate and ALWAYS praise her anytime she enters on her own.

  • Once your dog enters and exits her crate willingly, close the door for a few seconds. Remain close to the crate, praising her while she is inside. Let her out in a quiet, calm manner. Do not release her if she is barking or crying…wait until she is settled down. Again, do not reward bad behavior.

  • Gradually extend the amount of time your puppy spends in the crate. Your first few absences should be less than 30 minutes. Keep your departures and arrivals low key. Continue to crate your puppy for a few minutes each day when you are home, so that crating does not always predict that you are leaving. Encouraging your dog to eliminate in the proper place immediately after she is released from the crate will quickly teach her when and where to “take care of business.”

  • Within a few attempts over two or three days, most puppies will enter the crate willingly and quietly settle down for a nap. 

 

  • Plan to enroll your puppy in a puppy training class. 

  • Supervise your puppy at all times. If you are unable to supervise, place your puppy in a safe area, such as a crate or play yard. 

  • Praise your puppy when it does a good job.

  • Don’t allow your puppy to chew on shoes or fingers. Say “No!’ and give them an appropriate chew toy

  • Allow your puppy to rest frequently, as they are growing and need lots of rest.

  • Teach your children the proper way to play with the puppy.

  • Playing too rough with a new puppy may make the puppy aggressive.

  • Teach your puppy that every family member is dominant. She has been removed from her pack and is eager to determine a new hierarchy. Holding your puppy like a baby, tummy up, will teach them that you are in charge.

  • Brush your puppy often and keep their nails trimmed, so they are used to being groomed.

  • Don’t bathe your puppy more than one time a week. Use an appropriate puppy shampoo. Human shampoo will dry out your puppy’s skin and cause skin issues. 

  • Make sure you take your puppy to the veterinarian on a regular basis.

  • Be careful not to expose your puppy to dogs, people, places, etc. before it is fully vaccinated (at approx 16 weeks of age.)